What was Germany like 1910?

What was happening in Germany in the 1910s?

This huge expansion of industry led to significant demographic changes. By 1910 60% of Germans lived in towns and cities. The population of Berlin doubled between 1875 and 1910 and other cities like Munich, Essen and Kiel grew rapidly. By 1910 there were 48 German towns with populations over 100,000.

What was life like in Germany in the early 1900s?

By 1900, Germany had split into two cultures. One was a conservative, authoritarian, business-driven group that was very wary of the working class while the other was the working class that greatly benefitted in the time in Germany known as the Grűnderzeit – the good times.

Who led Germany in 1910?

Wilhelm II (1859-1941), the German kaiser (emperor) and king of Prussia from 1888 to 1918, was one of the most recognizable public figures of World War I (1914-18). He gained a reputation as a swaggering militarist through his speeches and ill-advised newspaper interviews.

What was Germany in 1914?

By 1880 Chancellor Otto von Bismarck had unified Germany into a federation of 22 central European kingdoms or principalities. … The largest of these states was Prussia. The King of Prussia, Wilhelm II, was also the German Emperor (Kaiser).

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What major events happened in Germany?

The Weimar Republic (1919-1933)

  • 1919 – Weimar Established.
  • 1920 – Berlin Kapp Putsch.
  • 1920 – Founding of the Nazi Party.
  • 1920 – Otto Braun, Prussian Prime Minister.
  • 1920 – Paul Whitman Band Brings American Jazz to Germany.
  • 1921 – Cabinet of Dr. …
  • 1922 – Founding of Hitler Youth.

What was going on in Germany in 1890?

1890 – Growing workers’ movement culminates in founding of Social Democratic Party of Germany. 1918 – Germany defeated, signs armistice. Emperor William II abdicates and goes into exile. 1919 – Treaty of Versailles: Germany loses colonies and land to neighbours, pays large-scale reparations.

What was wrong with Kaiser Wilhelm arm?

Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany (1859) developed a weak and noticeably short left arm during childhood, commonly attributed to nerve damage caused by the use of excessive force during his difficult breech delivery, Erb’s palsy.